Voles That Console

Feeling stressed? Hug a prairie vole! This is Sandra Tsing Loh with the Loh Down on Science. When you’re upset, friends come to comfort you. Why? Because of oxytocin, a.k.a. the love hormone. It’s linked to the warm fuzzy feelings you get from a hug. But studying oxytocin and fuzzy

Stressed-Out Chicks

Are the most popular kids also the most stressed out? This is Sandra Tsing Loh with the Loh Down on Science, saying: You’d be surprised what the little birds tell us! At Oxford and Saint Andrews universities, researchers investigated what factors make youngsters more social adults. The researchers turned to

Foot-Flaggin’ Frogs

Waving the white flag has a seductive new meaning! This is Sandra Tsing Loh with the Loh Down on Science, saying surrender — to the power of amphibian love. Meet the Bornean rock frog. These creatures live near waterfalls, and enjoy long hops on the beach. However, these romantic scenes

Fizzy and Fat

Your beverage of choice. Fizzy or flat? This is Sandra Tsing Loh with the Loh Down on Science. We know that sugary sodas can pack on pounds. But we love our bubbly bevs! So we’re cutting back on soda, drinking more sparkling water, and staying hydrated! That’s a healthy lifestyle

Your Cheatin’ Hormones

Can our hormones make us cheaters? This is Sandra Tsing Loh with the Loh Down on Science. Most discussions about cheating focus on ethics. But psychologist Robert Josephs, of the University of Texas at Austin, wondered: Are hormones involved? Because goodness knows hormones impact other decisions. If you know what

Synch Into Sleep

Is lack of sleep throwing your body off beat? This is Sandra Tsing Loh with the Loh Down on Science. Think of your body as an orchestra. The maestro is a master clock that lives in your brain. It keeps time by syncing with light and dark. The instruments are

Poo IQ

Want to know how smart your baby will be? Check her diaper! This is Sandra Tsing Loh with the Loh Down on Science…and baby poop. Fun fact: your poop is loaded with bacteria. These bacteria come from your gut where trillions of them live. They help us digest food, protect